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Breastfeeding Outside the Box

We are proud to present a series of podcasts for parents Breastfeeding Outside the Box, where we aim to support the nourishing and nurturing of babies in exceptional families - families who historically have not received the help and support they need and deserve. Our exceptional families include adoptive, intended, and foster families; gender and sexual minorities; families with special needs babies; parents who have had breast surgery; mothers with IGT or low milk production for other reasons; exclusively pumping mothers; and more.
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Now displaying: Category: general
Jan 25, 2017
What do parents most want to know about inducing lactation?  One of the things they most want to know is whether they will be able produce enough milk to meet all their baby's nutritional needs - what we often refer to as "a full milk supply." Most parents who induce lactation produce anywhere from a few drops to a full milk supply.  This is a huge range of results!  So, can we predict how much milk a parent inducing lactation may make?  What factors influence eventual milk production? In today's podcast, Alyssa and Hope discuss these questions and more.
 
Jan 11, 2017

Mari is a scientist and an innovator ... and an intended mother through surrogacy who nursed her babies.  So when the Medela Supplemental Nursing System - more commonly known as the SNS - wasn't meeting her needs, Mari tweaked it.  She didn't like the way it worked using gravity, got caught on her long hair and glasses when she hung it around her neck, leaked, and was difficult to know whether baby was getting supplement through the feeding tube.  Mari modified how she used her SNS to fix these issues - and now you can too!

Oct 6, 2016

‚ÄčIt was a shock for Rosalie when it was determined postpartum that she had a condition called Insufficient Glandular Tissue, more commonly referred to as IGT.  IGT is a breast condition that makes it difficult - and in most cases impossible - for a nursing parent to produce enough milk to meet all her baby's feeding requirements. Rosalie understands firsthand how difficult this diagnosis can be.  She also understands that it doesn't mean the end of breastfeeding.  Today, as a lactation consultant working with nursing parents with IGT, Rosalie focuses on developing a plan for long-term breastfeeding success, which she believes (and we agree!) is very possible for parents with IGT.  In this week's podcast, Rosalie shares with us about IGT with the heart of someone who has been there and the wisdom of her professional experience.  

Sep 28, 2016

When I (Alyssa) began my nursing journey almost 20 years ago, nursing in public was a BIG DEAL.  There would be criticism by others.  There was the dilemma about how and whether to cover up.  It made it pretty challenging to leave the house and still feel like you could meet the needs of your baby.  What really surprises me is that this situation hasn't changed much since then - even though many more parents are breastfeeding now!  But I hope that change is on the horizon. Robin gives us lots of information on how today's new parents can be part of that change to make nursing in public more accessible and comfortable for all. 

Jul 27, 2016

You are in for a treat with this lovely same-sex female couple who shared the role of breastfeeding their daughter. Rachel and Talana explain that co-nursing has been a delicate balance but with many advantages.  It enhanced the closeness each parent experienced with their daughter.  It made meeting their child's needs easier.  And it strengthened their bond as a couple.  The fact that Rachel is a lactation consultant helped get them though some tough spots - and lucky for many of you, Rachel and Talana's wise words can guide you through as well.

Apr 27, 2016

Becca didn't give up.  When breastfeeding got off to a tough start and her milk production dwindled, she knew in her heart it wasn't too late.  With time, hard work, and determination Becca brought her milk back after she had lost it -a process called relactation.  She used a breast pump, medications, herbs, and the help of a myriad of local professionals.  And one pump at a time, one ounce at a time, she eventually built her milk production up to a full supply.

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